One thing that you can be sure of when you get treated by a Physio or similar is that a practitioner can only learn so much by testing you on the bed. Unless your symptoms are very acute or present while just sitting there, the likelihood of figuring out your movement compensations is null unless you’re tested on your feet, whether in the first session or a later one.

If you’re only getting an explanation of ‘this is tight’, you’re probably not going to understand the connection between movement, so probe further. You ought to be exposed to higher loading in the specific patterns that it is unstable in too.

Knowing how to progress from simple to complex movement patterns gives your physio an edge so having a background in strength and conditioning can be a real bonus for tricky issues in particular. Simply by running you through a personal training session certain patterns can emerge and be corrected.

For example, I was recently assessing a person for low back pain. No findings emerged until higher speed and power was applied to movements and it showed he had faulty landing mechanics leading to excessive load going into his low back rather than being absorbed at the hip. It’s about seeing the full spectrum of movement and being able to go from low to high in a logical manner.

Which brings me to another point: the final answer is not always ‘x is tight and you need to stretch it‘!